Dr Sim urges Chinese community to make Sarawak first priority

Dr Sim at SUPP Chinese new Year open house

By Wilfred Pilo

KUCHING, Feb 5: The Chinese community should lead by example in putting Sarawak first to unite other races in fighting for the state’s rights.

Sarawak United People’s Party (SUPP) president Datuk Dr Sim Kui Hian said the Chinese community were very much a part of Sarawak like others born and bred in the state.

Citing Gabungan Parti Sarawak (GPS)’ “Sarawak first” slogan, he reminded that the Chinese community was no exception when it came to upholding or benefitting from the Sarawak first movement, as they were no different than any other Sarawakians.

“My message to the Sarawak Chinese community is that they are part and parcel of ‘Sarawak first’. You cannot expect other races to say Sarawak first but the Chinese community ‘tengok sahaja’, or just look only.


“The Chinese, the Malays, Orang Ulu, the Dayaks, we must get together to make Sarawak our first priority. If we are divided we cannot win.

“Sarawak has been ‘robbed’ of its resources for so many years and now we have the opportunity to be free and we must defend it now, otherwise we don’t have the chance anymore,” Dr Sim said at SUPP’s Chinese New Year open house here today.

He added that GPS, the state governing coalition, was very determined to reclaim Sarawak’s rights that had been eroded over the years.

He said this time around, the formation of GPS, which comprised SUPP, Parti Pesaka Bumiputera Bersatu (PBB), Parti Rakyat Sarawak (PRS) and Progressive Democratic Party (PDP), also provided a platform for the Chinese community to actively participate with other races in putting Sarawak first.

“GPS is clear in telling everybody about this and Pakatan Harapan is not going to save Sarawak. How is Pakatan going to put Sarawak first? Is Putrajaya going to prioritise Sarawak?” Dr Sim continued.

The Batu Kawah assemblyman said the Chinese community must be in sync with all races in the state. With GPS out of the Barisan Nasional regime, it is free to make decisions that benefit Sarawak without being tied down or controlled by other political masters.

“We must not be out of sync, we must join other communities. Sarawak belongs to the Chinese, Malay, Dayak, Orang Ulu and others. We must do this (fighting for Sarawak rights), this is our last chance.

“If we don’t get it this time around, it could take another 55 years before we can win back our rights but by then, there might not be any more Sarawak,” he opined, in reference to Sarawak partnership in the formation of Malaysia since 1963.

Dr Sim pointed out that the Chinese community’s commitment to GPS’ cause will reinforce the coalition’s struggle to uphold Sarawak rights.

“I often reiterate that if we Sarawakians don’t defend Sarawak, nobody is going to do it. Nobody is going to love Sarawak if not for us.

“We have learned a lot from our last coalition partnership with peninsula-based parties and now we are finally free (after forming GPS). In a national coalition, you need everybody to agree and then, priority was putting Malaysia first and not Sarawak,” he continued.

Dr Sim said with GPS, the state governing coalition parties were working closer than ever in prioritising Sarawak development, economic growth and the people’s social wellbeing. — DayakDaily