SDGA urges govt to adopt Indigenous Devt Policy

SDGA president Dr Dusit Jaul

KUCHING: Sarawak Dayak Graduates Association (SDGA) president Dr Dusit Jaul has urged the government to adopt the Indigenous Development Policy which was submitted two years ago and not make a mockery of its “people-centric approach”.

In a statement today, Dusit said for Malaysia Day to be meaningful, all citizens of this country must have a sense of belonging.

“For Malaysia Day to be meaningful, all citizens of this country must be made to feel that they are part of the nation; being well-treated; their contribution to the nation recognised; their potential fully tapped and their talent made to good use.

“All these (can be) made possible if the government’s policy of inclusiveness is well put into practice, not just mere rhetoric,” said Dusit in a Malaysia Day press statement today.

He hoped all government policies and laws made would be in line with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP).


“In the context of the indigenous people, specifically the Dayak community, it is hoped that the government, be it at federal or state level, (will) take concrete steps to comprehensively review government policies, laws, and regulations to harmonise them with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP), a declaration adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007, which Malaysia supported.

“The mechanism to translate UNDRIP’s objective of fair treatment to the indigenous peoples must be in place.

“A step forward would be for the government to adopt an Indigenous Development Policy, something which we in the Dayak NGOs have forwarded to the government two years ago at the initial stage of formulating the Eleventh Malaysia Plan (11MP) document, and to which, till today, we have not heard of any positive development.

“We hope the federal government will take serious note of our request when it conducts the mid-term review of the 11MP.”

It is also his hope that there will be no scepticism and suspicion towards the government.

“The last thing we want to see happening is the feeling of scepticism among certain sections of the rakyat towards the government’s call for its citizens to provide feedback and input for government planning programmes.

“It is a mockery of a ‘rakyat-centric approach’ in formulating government policy if in the final outcome, the rakyat’s views and feedback are not considered fully,” Dusit said.